Coleridge: We’ll have a gay old time.

Archbishop Mark Coleridge has been pushing the gayification of the Holy Catholic Church for some time. The Plenary Council may not acknowledge it, the other bishops may not be saying anything, but the pro-LGBTIQZ+ New Ways Ministry is very happy with him.

New Ways evenly lets the cat out of the bag by admitting that “the question of how the Catholic Church might become a more welcoming and inclusive community without abandoning long-held understandings” is at the centre of the global synodal process??!!

First I’d heard of that. I thought it was mainly about institutionalising the worship of demons but that’s just my take.

New Ways just loves Coleridge’s idea of abandoning the notion of “loving the sinner while hating the sin.” Of course they do – it sounds too Catholic. THIS is what they want instead: “individual pastors and ministers” who “often accompany and support LGBTQ+ Catholics in meaningful ways.”

That is, priests (and nuns and bishops and even POPES) who claim to be Catholic yet happily undermine Her teachings at every opportunity.

Yet, that is not enough for Coleridge and his sodomitical fans: they’ve realised that Modern Man wants authenticity. So rather than turn their back on their wicked ways, renounce sin and embrace the True Faith in its entirety, the Judas Club wants to reshape doctrine in its own ghastly image, asking what they believe to be the million dollar question: “What does the redeemed life look like now?”

I hate to break it to you, Your Grace, but here is your answer:

Redeemed life looks the same as it ever was: Prayer, penance and virtue. (Here’s a dictionary if you need to look that word up.) No shortcuts. And definitely no sodomy.

Australia’s Bishops want Protestants to teach them how to be Catholic?

Yes, you read that correctly. Since Protestants have been doing “synodality” far longer than we Catholics have, we need to study them to see how it’s done.

Or something like that.

Here’s what the Australian Catholic Bishops Conference put out this week:

To help better understand the place of synodality in the Catholic Church, ecumenical leaders will attend national Uniting and Anglican gatherings this month to see how synodality works in those communities.

The global Synod on Synodality has encouraged engagement with ecumenical and interfaith groups as part of the process leading towards the gathering in Rome in October 2023.

Cardinals Mario Grech, general secretary of the Synod of Bishops, and Kurt Koch, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, recently said: “Conscious of our need for the accompaniment and the many gifts of our brothers and sisters in Christ, we call on them to journey with us during these two years and we sincerely pray that Christ will lead us closer to him and so to one another.”

ACBC Media blog May 4th.

So let me get this right: to learn how to be better Catholics, we need to learn from Protestants. Right.

Maybe we should send our teenagers to carjacking school to make them better drivers? Or send our daughters to Marie Stopes to make them better mothers? (Oh, I forgot – Archbishop Comensoli has already tried something like that.)

The article goes onto say that the Australian Synod of Bishops committee is sending “key ecumenical leaders” (Catholics) to the Uniting Church’s Assembly and to the Anglican Synod, which are both being held this month. This is where some of your hard-earned church-offerings are ending up, friends: sending Catholics to take notes from the Protestants.

One of the participants is a Fr Trainor, a priest from Adelaide. He said that “One of the key lessons I’ve learned is that open and friendly dialogue is at the heart of communion in faith …. The core of our communion is Baptism, which leads us to see each other as sisters and brothers in faith.”

So which is it, Father? Is it Baptism or is it “dialogue” that is the basis of our alleged communion with heretical churches? It matters not – neither would pass the Syllabus test, would they?

One good thing could come of this kind of meeting, though. If Catholics hear from their Protestant peers about the numerous difficulties involved in being a married priest, or the practical challenges of being a female priestess, or the lack of acceptance for (God forbid) an openly sodomite bishop, they just might have second thoughts about their own radical plans for the Church.

But until then, be prepared for more of this nonsense as the increasingly irrelevant Plenary movement morphs into the far more fashionable Synodality movement.

At least that’s what the Bishops are trying to convince us of, anyway.

More cringeworthy Synodality from the ACBC

Australia’s Catholic Bishops Conference must have decided that the patronising non-Catholic gibberish it inflicted on us for the Plenary Council wasn’t enough – still too many Catholics actually attending Mass, perhaps? No, apparently we need even more condescending advice, even more irrelevant talking points, all embellished with that infantile logo which has found its unfortunate way onto the promotional materials for Bergoglio’s “Synod on Synods.”

You all know what I think about that logo.

The more imaginative among you may see Van Gogh’s haystacks being blown around by the Holy Ghost as a disenfranchised crowd (from “the margins”, no doubt) turns its back on the Sun of Righteousness.

But I see a tiny, defenceless child being sucked from its mother’s womb, in order to make a toxic gene serum for the world’s fearful, clueless citizens who were encouraged by their fearful, clueless bishops.

Either way, the whole thing is a farce.

Who can actually repeat that title with a straight face? A “Synod on Synods”, indeed! It is like something straight from Lewis Carol.

We don’t see issuing from St Peter’s a (sorely-needed) “Catechism on Catechisms”, do we? Should the Holy Father compose a “Litany of Litanies”? Or should he offer a whole mass of Masses (Latin, of course!)?

Now, to be fair, John XXIII did effectively achieve an anathema on anathemas. And until recent times, the Church was known for Her tradition of tradition. But that was all in the dim, dark, unenlightened past. Now we have the Modern Methods.

We have scientific instructions that explain the way in which we should conduct our conversations, our dialogue. From the ACBC:

Speakers work in a clockwise direction. The facilitator may nominate someone to
start, then participants can share one after the other.
• Everyone speaks for two to three minutes about what happened during their
reflection time.
• Begin with the phrase: “In my reflection today…”

It is a brave participant who would dare to move in an anti-clockwise direction.

Survivors enter the Second Round, where a different phrase is used:

This round will be shorter than the first. Speaking order is clockwise, as before.
• Everyone speaks for one to two minutes.
• This is an opportunity to answer questions like:
• What consoled me or struck me as I listened to my companions?
• What did I hear? What did I feel? What was the Spirit saying to me/us?
• Was I especially touched by a particular sharing?
• Begin with the phrase, “In the group I heard…and it left me feeling…”

Dear Lord. What was the Spirit saying??

That the bishops need to be accountable to all those Catholics who are now out of work because they refused the vex? I could imagine the Holy Ghost saying that.

Or that He backed Pius V all the way when that good man announced the fate of anyone who tried to do away with the Traditional Mass?

Just ask Paul VI; he learned a bit about God’s wrath and it wasn’t very pleasant.

Consequences? [Source here.]

I know I’ve gotten off track but it is embarrassing to read what those highly-paid Catholic bureaucrats come up with when they’re working on their favourite mess: reimagining the Church.

“Discernment”, cringey prayers, cringey graphics and cringey sharing-groups from triple-jabbed ecumaniacs. Do they realise how irrelevant they are? We are over it.

Oh. There’s one more thing the Spirit might say if anyone concerned about their credibility was ever to listen to Him: if you must engage in a heterodox Modernist talkfest, then at least make the effort to get the name of your own country right.