How does a prelate become a Freemason?

From ‘Unholy Craft’by Arnaud de Lassus

In Italy, in 1999, a book was published anonymously entitled Via col vento in Vaticano and, according to the editor the French version, “would have come from a group of high-ranking Vatican dignitaries who chose to break the law of silence.”

It is a collective work describing various disorders affecting the Holy See. The chapters are not all of equal value and some call for serious reservations. Chapter 18, The Smoke of Satan in the Vatican, deals with Freemasonry and, in four very interesting pages, explains the process used to entice prelates to affiliate to the craft.

There is a real novitiate for recruiting ecclesiastics to the Masonic order. Among ecclesiastics, there is a certain category of men in which Masonry seeks possible collaborators; these must combine certain gifts: keen intelligence, a great desire for advancement, ambition, quickness to understand and to pretend to understand nothing, willingness to serve and, if necessary, a good physical presence and a pleasing face.

When a young ecclesiastic meets these criteria … it remains only to engage him by titillating his pride.

The author insists on the secrecy of the operation which is a consideration of its success:

In this first phase it is absolutely necessary that the designated candidate remains in total ignorance of what is being set up around him. The Masonic technique requires to be revealed progressively, so that the associate discovers the secret society’s aims only gradually, as the superiors think fit.

The first contact is made as naturally as possible. An invitation to an accomodating embassy for a national festival, unexpectedly meeting someone who claims to be delighted to have met him, a prelate who asks him for something and shows his gratitude. Then comes the phase of compliments and flattery: What a treasure, such kindness, such keen intelligence … You deserve better – you are wasting your time. Why don’t we address each other less formally? …. Then one enters the phase of future prospects: I know such a prelate, such a cardinal, such an ambassador or such a minister ….I’ll willingly put in a word for you; I’ll say you are someone who deserves higher responsibilities ….

At this stage, the proposer immediately realises whether the interested party has taken the bait.

The process thus described will continue for several years, always in secret.

Gradually, the promises made are fulfilled. The pre-selected candidate notes that these were not in vain and believes it is his duty to be grateful to the friend whom he regards as his benefactor. During this time, his career progresses very smoothly without encountering any difficulties. Brilliant prospects in the service of the Church appear before him and he begins to see a position which would suit him rather well.

Then, when fired with ambition and vanity, the naive prelate has at hand the evidence of his effortless advancement, which he hasn’t yet fully grasped, and when other promotion to higher levels still beckon – it is at this stage that the explanatory phase arrives.

The recruiters explain to the candidate that:

  • If he has attained such wonderful positions, it is thanks to the discrete support of the Masonic order and its friends
  • He is free to continue to collaborate with this order, which will ensure his advancement continues.

In this very delicate phase, it is up to the prelate, in crisis, to decide which choice to make.

The desire to continue to advance, the excitement of knowing one is being introduced into the Masonic group, the fear of unavoidable revelations should he refuse to join, or, on the contrary, the vacuum he can already feel around him, the fraternal exhortation of some dignitary to go ahead, as he himself has done formerly: In a word, all this ends up convincing the prelate to follow the path mapped out for him by others without him being aware of it.

The higher one’s position, the more likely one is likely to be gripped by the fear of losing the high position one has attained. One abyss opens after another. One seeks to justify oneself.

Many prelates, thus compromised, end up by giving in and become members of the Masonic apparatus and under obligation to obey its instructions.

Thus, once infiltrated into his ecclesiastical setting, the brave Masonic novice’s first duty is to maintain his credibility by keeping his promises and, if necessary, to cast, as poseurs and hypocrites, the prelates of the place he has infiltrated.

Skilfully hooked, the new Freemason then becomes a pawn in the secret lodge’s sphere of action and is added to the others already there. His rise can now continue unabated towards the top with the help of other ‘brothers.’

This is a remarkable process, founded on secrecy, which can easily last ten years and which can be implemented by disciplined, well trained …. and patient personnel. It is undoubtedly used not only in the Curia, but just as much in the secular and ecclesiastical worlds.

Two general remarks can be made following the observations which have been made on Masonic infiltration within the Curia and on the process used for that purpose.

The presence of Freemasons in key positions in the Church explains to a great extent the doctrinal and disciplinary deviations of these last forty years. It is particularly clear in the case of liturgical reform.

As for the process that is used to produce Masonic prelates, it is very important to understand it and to make it known, because it obviously loses its effectiveness when it is known.

In conclusion, let us remain alert to the Masonic question. It is one of the keys to the current crisis, political as well as religious and, as Pope Leo XIII said in the encyclical Humanum genus,it is necessary ‘to tear away the mask from Freemasonry and to let it be seen as it really is.

Let us remain alert and keep faith in the Church; we know that the gates of hell will not prevail against Her.

The Church is truly a supernatural society, truly holy. The Mystical Body of Christ, the Bride of Christ, of unblemished fidelity, in the image of the Virgin Mary. Without exception, throughout the centuries, and until the end of the world, ‘She is Jesus Christ, given and communicated. That and nothing else.’

3 thoughts on “How does a prelate become a Freemason?

  1. My understanding is that the real problem with the Freemasons is that they infiltrated already as such. They weren’t believers to begin with. The greatest numbers of Satanists found in the Vatican were not recruited from among actual Catholic Priests, but the Communist homosexual atheists that entered the seminaries. I have no doubt some were blackmailed into ‘cooperating’. That’s a tactic that is old as the hills. But it’s the fact that the seminaries were corrupted and allowed thousands of Communist homosexual atheists to enter that resulted in the perversion of the hierarchy.

    You really should read what you’ve written a few times and make grammatical and other corrections. A few mistakes here and there are not so bad, but this article needs some real cleanup.

    That said …

    Love your posts!

    Like

    1. I am ashamed. The typos are fixed now. More haste, less speed is needed, particularly when transcribing!

      Not all of the Masonic clerics are Satanists, although some are. Many were conscripted according to the method explained here. This explains why we often see a ‘good’ bishop who inexplicably fails to speak out on serious breaches of morals or discipline. And why conservative bishops sometimes turn 180 degrees to promote something evil like the jab.

      You are right, though, in saying that many never had faith and were wicked goats from the beginning.

      Like

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