Some Freemasons are more Catholic than the Pope

This little story caught my eye: a non-denominational Christian pastor was expelled from his Masonic lodge for promoting same-sex marriage.

Once a Southern Baptist missionary, “Brother” Tag Thompson was running his own “non-creedal” church which had a particular outreach to the LGBTIQ community. Thompson had become interested in Freemasonry after reading the Da Vinci Code and joined after discovering Masonry’s supposed focus on exterior works such as helping the community and “fraternity”.

A Facebook post in which he offered to officiate at same-sex weddings drew the ire of some of his fellow Masons. Thompson had to face a tribunal of the Tennessee Freemasons and it was established that his behaviour violated their statutes: he was eventually thrown out, although some other Masonic lodges disagreed with the decision. Notably and unsurprisingly, these included California and Washington DC.

The conservative stance taken by the Tennessee Masons is quite a contrast to the attitude of our reigning pontiff who has an open-arms policy towards members of the LGBTIQ community – he has issued no condemnation of the German bishop attending a same-sex wedding, and has had little to say about the German church’s general promotion of same-sex unions. On top of that, the attention shown by the Pope to sodo-priest James Martin is nothing short of scandalous.

“Er, Jimmy, I get the the secret handshake but do you have to make it so obvious?”

So does this mean that Freemasons are becoming more virtuous or that this is evidence that they should be admitted into the Church? By no means at all!

Rather, it is simply another an indication that the human element of the Catholic Church is wallowing in the mire of corruption – so much so that even Masons are capable of making the Pope look bad.

New ACBC head has Modernist form

It is with great regret that I inform you, dear readers, that the new head of the Australian Catholic Bishops Conference will be none other than Archbishop Timothy Costelloe of Perth. Archbishop Costelloe is no stranger to these pages, of course. His dedication to corruption, Modernism and COVID jabs is second to none, and it is fitting that he plans to take advice on his new role from the former president and fellow progressive, Archbishop Coleridge.

The ACBC’s media blog reported Costelloe’s glowing remarks about Coleridge:

“It was Archbishop Coleridge who guided our response beyond the Royal Commission, represented the Church in Australia at the global summit on sexual abuse and steered the bishops through a pandemic and a host of other challenges. Archbishop Coleridge has been a calm and considered leader locally and in the global Church and will be a trusted adviser for me in this new role.”

Sounds like the Australian Church has a bright (illuminated?) future ahead of it.

Costelloe also noted that the Church, of which he is a Prince and for whose members he was ordained in order to “preach, teach and sanctify”, still has a few things going for it – none of which, unfortunately, are spiritual benefits. He said:

“The Church in this country is an immense contributor to our society, through our parishes, our schools, our hospital and aged care, our social services and countless other ministries. As we continue to contemplate how we live out the Gospel in this age, including through the Plenary Council, I look forward to working with my brother bishops and the People of God to carry forward Christ’s mission.”

So, just another CEO of just another NGO, implementing the SDG’s of the UN and WEF. If that isn’t enough TLA’s (Three-Letter-Acronyms) for you, then here’s another:

IHS. It represents the Holy Name of Our Lord Jesus Christ, Redeemer of the world, Who was crucified and died for our sins that we may have eternal life.

May the same Lord Jesus Christ restore His Church and replace His Holy Name on the lips of all lost shepherds – those who seem to have forgotten the role for which they are so handsomely paid and for which the price of betrayal is eternal damnation.

Australia’s Bishops want Protestants to teach them how to be Catholic?

Yes, you read that correctly. Since Protestants have been doing “synodality” far longer than we Catholics have, we need to study them to see how it’s done.

Or something like that.

Here’s what the Australian Catholic Bishops Conference put out this week:

To help better understand the place of synodality in the Catholic Church, ecumenical leaders will attend national Uniting and Anglican gatherings this month to see how synodality works in those communities.

The global Synod on Synodality has encouraged engagement with ecumenical and interfaith groups as part of the process leading towards the gathering in Rome in October 2023.

Cardinals Mario Grech, general secretary of the Synod of Bishops, and Kurt Koch, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, recently said: “Conscious of our need for the accompaniment and the many gifts of our brothers and sisters in Christ, we call on them to journey with us during these two years and we sincerely pray that Christ will lead us closer to him and so to one another.”

ACBC Media blog May 4th.

So let me get this right: to learn how to be better Catholics, we need to learn from Protestants. Right.

Maybe we should send our teenagers to carjacking school to make them better drivers? Or send our daughters to Marie Stopes to make them better mothers? (Oh, I forgot – Archbishop Comensoli has already tried something like that.)

The article goes onto say that the Australian Synod of Bishops committee is sending “key ecumenical leaders” (Catholics) to the Uniting Church’s Assembly and to the Anglican Synod, which are both being held this month. This is where some of your hard-earned church-offerings are ending up, friends: sending Catholics to take notes from the Protestants.

One of the participants is a Fr Trainor, a priest from Adelaide. He said that “One of the key lessons I’ve learned is that open and friendly dialogue is at the heart of communion in faith …. The core of our communion is Baptism, which leads us to see each other as sisters and brothers in faith.”

So which is it, Father? Is it Baptism or is it “dialogue” that is the basis of our alleged communion with heretical churches? It matters not – neither would pass the Syllabus test, would they?

One good thing could come of this kind of meeting, though. If Catholics hear from their Protestant peers about the numerous difficulties involved in being a married priest, or the practical challenges of being a female priestess, or the lack of acceptance for (God forbid) an openly sodomite bishop, they just might have second thoughts about their own radical plans for the Church.

But until then, be prepared for more of this nonsense as the increasingly irrelevant Plenary movement morphs into the far more fashionable Synodality movement.

At least that’s what the Bishops are trying to convince us of, anyway.