A Christmas Dog Whistle from Coleridge

 From the Merriam-Webster online dictionary: a ‘dog whistle’ is a coded message communicated through words or phrases commonly understood by a particular group of people, but not by others.

Writing about Archbishop Comensoli’s light-filled Christmas message brought back memories of Archbishop Coleridge’s very “enlightening” Christmas tidings of 2019. His 30 minute chat came in the form of a Facebook live event; I’m told some of the comments made at the time were quite confrontational – they no longer appear on the Facebook page, however.

A transcript of the most illuminative section is given below:

…The story of ancient Israel, very often, seemed hopeless, and time and time again, the Chosen People had to ‘rummage through the ruins’, as it were, in the search for a hope in the midst of what seemed to be a hopelessness.

And it’s really that ‘rummaging’ through a seemingly hopeless situation that generates the Bible that we have: a proclamation, not of a cheap hope, but a costly hope born always – and only – out of hopelessness.

And that’s why, in the beginning of the Bible, where we have the story of Creation, it begins in the darkness, the emptiness and the chaos. That’s always where the story of God-with-us begins. But this was the truth of ancient Israel’s history.

So that which is dark, empty and chaotic, that’s where we find – according to the Bible – real light, real fulness, and really, the order of God: the ‘great harmonics of love.’

Mark Coleridge, Archbishop of Brisbane, December 2019.

Now traditionally, the idea of ordo ab chao or “order out of chaos” is not a Catholic one, or even a Christian one: it is a Freemasonic idea.

Ordo ab chao is, in fact, the motto of the thirty-third degree.

There is more of this veiled Masonic language in the segment, too, like a reference to the “light at the heart of very darkness” when commenting on the push for euthanasia that was happening that the time.

Lux in tenebris is a Christian concept, of course; it is intrinsic to the message of Christ coming into the world for our redemption. But the phrase has been coopted by the Masons and other Gnostics and therefore serves well for the purposes of dog-whistling – especially when used by a bishop.

So, Masonic infiltrator or pious pastor? Well, that’s not for me to say.

But any bishop who mentions the “great harmonics of love” after suggesting that we have to “rummage around” to find God in our lives, is pretty suspect. Especially when, a couple of years down the track, he fires his priests for refusing to submit to that big old medical experiment we know only too well.

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